Argis Lens

Augmented Reality and Public Works Emergency Planning: 3 Ways to Prepare for the Next Natural Disaster with AR

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Learn how our augmented reality visualizer, the Argis Lens, can be an effective tool in planning for the next natural disaster.

 By Alyssa Grant

As our climate shifts to greater extremes, natural disasters have increased in frequency. Floods, hurricanes, bomb cyclones, and tornadoes, including the recent ones that devastated Missouri, are the worst-case weather lottery that no one wants to win. Public works emergency planning is vital and being well-prepared before disaster strikes can save lives and prevent millions of dollars in damage. Many municipalities and counties, like Roanoke County, VA, are shifting to public-facing apps to keep the public informed about potential issues related to extreme weather. Augmented reality (AR) paired with GIS data can be an effective tool in ensuring your municipality and citizens are prepared well in advance.

1.     Quality-Check Your ArcGIS Data

Viewing ArcGIS data through our mobile augmented reality (AR) visualizer provides you with immediate, real-world context. When ArcGIS data is downloaded to our mobile app, the Argis Lens, users can easily visualize underground infrastructure and various flood scenarios. Looking at a 2D map requires translating two-dimensional data into a three-dimensional world. With the 3D visualization capabilities of the Lens, the work of translation is done for you, giving a clear picture of how GIS data exists in reality. The Lens allows you to double-check your data and see discrepancies between it and the 3D world in which we live. Use the Lens to confirm your GIS data’s accuracy so that your municipality can respond to emergencies with more precision.

 

2.     AR’s Utility in City Planning 

Yearly flooding is a way of life for many communities in the United States. As weather events continue to break historic records, areas vulnerable to flooding have expanded. Utilize the Argis Lens as part of your building planning to visualize different flooding scenarios. See with your own eyes, in the field, how 3, 6, or 12 feet of floodwater interacts with the topography and elevation in your city and make city planning choices that can withstand historic weather events. 

 

3.     AR’s Usefulness in the Aftermath

After a tornado, flood, or hurricane, visual landmarks can be obliterated and elevation altered. If you have proactively improved your GIS data’s quality with the Argis Lens, it can also help locate infrastructure that might otherwise be difficult to find because of terrain and landmark changes, for instance, a natural gas valve that needs to be closed to prevent a potential explosion, because natural disasters create scenarios where response time is of the essence. The Lens could also be used in assisting in determining the last known location of people or facilities that have been affected, especially when the physical landscape has been changed beyond recognition.

 In the aftermath of extreme weather, a multitude of dangerous situations are created. Manhole covers can dislodge in flooding, endangering anyone nearby trying to maneuver through flood waters. The technology of the Lens can allow first responders to quickly determine where that danger might be present so that citizens can be warned to keep clear of the area.

 

Be Prepared with AR

“Expect the best, prepare for the worst.” Give yourself the advantage in public works emergency planning. Don’t be caught off guard. Harness the visualizing power of AR and see your data in a new way. Bring your GIS data to life with the Argis Lens.

Addressing Aging Infrastructure: Make AR Part of Your Solution

GIS data shown through augmented reality technology can help communicate discrepancies during the remediation process for upgrading underground infrastructure. 

By Alyssa Grant 

The Flint water crisis highlights the consequences of aging underground infrastructure and the deeply negative impact it can have on a community. Remediation can be a daunting, complex process. The remediation efforts to replace Flint’s lead and galvanized steel pipes with copper piping will be winding down by the end of the year. As of September 2018, 15,031 pipes have been excavated and 7,233 pipes have been identified as requiring replacement, underlining the scope of this headline-making water utility remediation project. 

Flint is not alone—aging underground infrastructure is a nationwide issue. The 2017 Infrastructure Report Card gives America’s drinking water a “D,” communicating that communities across the country are in dire need of water pipeline upgrades. 

Outdated natural gas pipelines are another concern. Old pipelines can leak, damaging the environment, even resulting in explosions causing property damage and fatalities, like the Merrimack Valley gas explosions on September 13, 2018 that resulted in 80 fires and one death. 

Updating aging utilities can be a complicated task.  Gregory Korte’s investigation on the state of our nation’s natural gas pipelines for USA Today revealed that the aging gas pipelines in Merrimack Valley were acknowledged to be a challenge to remediate:

“. . . Columbia Gas warned state regulators that replacing pipes in places like Lawrence would be difficult. The pipelines were in densely populated areas dominated by paved surfaces. They're intertwined with other utilities in crowded rights of way. " 

Unfortunately, the explosions occurred before improvements could be fully addressed. The costs related to the resulting damage could reach $1 billion

The complexities of underground infrastructure and the delicate excavation that can be involved in remediation underline the need for a sophisticated way to view and share mapping data. Some companies and municipalities are finding that augmented reality technology meets that need. 

What is augmented reality (AR)? This technology interposes computer-generated images in a real-world setting. Imagine being able to see GIS data through a cell phone camera—a scene you might see through the camera’s eye with AR could be a sewer line below a sidewalk intersected by a natural gas pipeline that crosses underneath an adjacent roadway. 

With the Argis Lens, a mobile AR application, that imagined scene is reality. The Lens quickly visually communicates what lies beneath the ground because a picture is worth a thousand words, especially when the complex GIS data of water or natural gas pipelines and sewer or stormwater systems are involved. The Argis Lens dynamically translates GIS data into AR imagery on mobile iOS devices.  

Using AR, underground infrastructure stakeholders can project their GIS data on new job sites to show foremen and construction crews where underground assets are located in real time. In addition, with the Lens, they can confirm that all assets are marked appropriately before excavation begins. Leveraging this technology, these companies are seeing a new level of collaboration between their asset protection teams and contractors because they are using AR to communicate high-risk areas where particular care needs to be taken before digging.

Cities, pipeline, and utility companies can all benefit from increased productivity on the job site, improved communication, and data quality confirmation. As infrastructure below the ground continues to deteriorate and become obsolete, proactive stakeholders with underground assets will turn to new technology, such as the Argis Lens, for more effective solutions as they upgrade and improve what is hidden.

ArcGIS and CAD Featured on Esri

ArcGIS and CAD Featured on Esri

Argis Solutions recent work with Silver Lake Construction Company has been highlighted in depth by Chris Andrews on Esri’s ArcGIS blog. Andrews recognizes the value augmented reality (AR) adds to GIS data, noting: 

 “As a product manager driving 3D, BIM, and other related software efforts at Esri, I’m always looking for applications of geospatial technology that can improve the lives of real users.  We get asked about AR a ton and whether through partner apps, such as Argis Solutions, or through development using our ArcGIS Runtime SDKs, it’s great to be able to report that real partners and customers are building AR applications that are transforming the experience of GIS in the field.  I expect to see much more like this in the future.”